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A Mother’s Story of Alcohol Addiction and Redemption

By Jeannie Colter

In “Why More Young Moms are Turning to Drugs and Alcohol,” Glamour magazine interviewed Colleen to discuss why she succumbed to addiction and what made her finally seek drug and alcohol treatment. Colleen says she did not drink while pregnant, dating the man she married, and that she even gave up alcohol for a year once to prove she didn’t have a problem.

Overwhelmed and Aiming to Please: Colleen had a lot of goals, and while there is nothing wrong with that, looking back, she sees that she may have wanted to accomplish more than she could handle: helping others, being active in her community, going back to school, and sticking to high standards for running her household.

Colleen observes:

“I was a people-pleasing person and set the bar too high. Growing up in an alcoholic home, I never felt good enough, and my parents constantly told me this. Feeling frustrated and overwhelmed, I’d pour a glass of wine to take the edge off. “

Losing Control: At some point, Colleen realized that it was the addiction that was in control. She hid alcohol around her house and had to drink more and more. She began to isolate herself from the community functions that she had once been enthusiastic about and found that she needed to drink to gain courage to leave the house.

Seeking Treatment: Colleen’s mother succumbed to alcoholism at 50 and it was difficult for Colleen to admit that she too, was an alcoholic. But she says her husband kicked her out and that she was heartbroken when her son, who was 12 at the time, “helped me pack and said he was afraid of me.”

She says being away from her children was not easy but that four months of residential treatment “was truly a gift.”  She now knows that she turned to alcohol because she was not able to address “underlying issues” but that by going through drug and alcohol treatment and working with professionals, she “was given the tools to live a sober life.”

If any of this seems familiar to you, call Transitions Recovery at 800-626-1980.