Menu Close

Choosing Between Inpatient and Outpatient Rehab

By Jeannie Colter

Addiction recovery begins with a decision. You have to decide that you want to be well and whole and stop living the kind of fractured life that one lives when alcohol or substance abuse takes over. When you decide that it is time to go to rehab, you have another decision—what kind of program would best suit your needs? You may have work or family considerations that will help you make your choice. Or you may need to decide based on your temperament.  No matter the program you choose, Transitions Recovery is committed to providing comprehensive, nationally leading drug treatment and alcohol addiction treatment services

Inpatient: With inpatient treatment, you check into a facility and live there as you go through a rehab program. Ehow.com says, “Once admitted, almost every hour of the patient’s day is filled to help them fight their addiction and keep their mind on staying sober.” This may sound intense but for some people this is exactly what they need to begin their journey of sobriety.

At Transitions, we are true to our name: we are not working with you so you can live successfully sober in our rehab facility–our goal is to help you transition back to your life. After we focus on treatment, we work with you so can prepare meals and complete other tasks that people tend to take for granted.

Outpatient: Choosing Outpatient substance abuse treatment does not mean that the person is less serious or that they are not going to receive high quality care. As Ehow.com notes, “Much like inpatient, outpatient patients will receive daily treatment at the center, which will usually take up a large portion of the day to keep them constantly focused on recovery.”

In an Outpatient program, you have a chance to apply what you are learning to your daily life and routines. You will eventually transition from being in an outpatient program to being someone who is continuing addiction recovery without taking part in rehab regularly. You can and are encouraged to continue getting help, via 12-step meetings or some other form or regular support.