Successful treatment of a substance addiction is a proud achievement. You’ve proven to yourself that you’re strong enough to overcome the grip of drugs and alcohol. Now that you’ve broken the cycle, use your new awareness to prevent situations and behaviors that can lead back to old abuse patterns.

Individuals who have relapsed admit that it wasn’t a spur-of-the-moment occurrence. In hindsight, they were able to look back and identify signs that led up to their relapse. This insight can help you develop strategies to keep from succumbing to temptation.

  1. Avoid surroundings that may include drugs and alcohol. This may seem like a no-brainer, but many people who have been through treatment believe that they can be around substances without indulging. That may or may not be true, but there’s no point in testing it. Keeping substances out of your universe strengthens your commitment to recovery.
  2. Continue regular therapy, whether it be individual, group or both. Substance abuse often involves numbing yourself so you don’t have to deal with emotions. Now that you’re observing your feelings with clear eyes, you need to learn to deal with them in a healthy way. A strong support system can help you develop appropriate ways to cope.
  3. Will power is like a muscle. The more often you use it, the stronger it gets. Each time you make the choice to stay sober, you’re building that “muscle”. Leverage these victories to increase your self-esteem and confidence.
  4. Set goals and use them to create a schedule. Aimlessness and boredom can be the first step toward slipping back into old habits. This doesn’t mean you have to fill every moment of the day with frantic activity. Are there any skills you’ve always wanted to learn, or projects you’ve put off to “someday”? Incorporate those plans into your daily life.

At Transitions Recovery, our comprehensive programs include lifetime aftercare. Our support doesn’t end once you leave our facility. Our team is available to help you with the challenges that arise during your continued recovery.